Bound Angle Yoga Pose
overview

Bound Angle Yoga Pose is a seated pose that targets the groin and inner thighs and is ideal for yogis and yoginis of all levels.

svadisthana – the sacral chakra
related poses
How to Do Bound Angle Yoga Pose
  1. Begin by sitting on your mat with your legs straight out in front of you, toes pointing up toward the ceiling.
  2. Bend you knees, pulling the heels of your feet as close to the groin as is comfortable.
  3. Keeping your feet close to the groin, let your knees drop down to the floor. Do not force the knees, let your thighs do the work and the knees will follow. The outsides of the feet should always be touching the floor.
  4. Sit up straight, lengthen the spine and keep your sitting bones on the floor. Keep your shoulders and arms loose and relaxed.
  5. Grasp your ankles or big toes with the thumb and first two fingers.
    Maintain pose for one to five minutes.
Notes
  • Breathe deeply through each step.
  • If you’re not used to this sitting this way, take it slowly.
Tips
Sit on a small pillow or folded towel/blanket. This is not only more comfortable, it encourages better posture. This is especially important for this pose, particularly if you have a history of groin or hip injuries.
Everyone’s body is unique, some might need higher supports than others. Experiment or consult an expert and see what works best for you.
If it’s difficult to maintain this pose try bracing your back against a wall, try gently rocking from side to side or softly bouncing your knees up and down. These movements relieve tension and generally make the position more comfortable.
Stretches & Strengthens

All Muscles: Groin, inner thighs, ankles, knees, feet
Target Muscles: Groin, inner thighs

Health Benefits of Bound Angle Yoga Pose
  • Calms the mind and relieves stress.
  • Hip opener.

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Baddha Konasana

(SOOP-tah BAH-dah cone-nAHS-anna)

baddha: bound, captured
kona: angle, corner
asana: posture

History & Mythology

History & Mythology

This pose is also sometimes referred to as the Cobbler’s Pose, as this is the typical position Indian streetside cobblers sit in when they work on shoes.
We are constantly researching to find more information about the history and mythology behind each pose. If you have any further information, we’d love to hear from you.