Revolved Head to Knee Yoga Pose
overview

Revolved Head to Knee Yoga Pose is a seated, twist pose that targets the hamstrings and lats and is ideal for yogis and yoginis at an intermediate level.

svadisthana – the sacral chakra
related poses
How To Do Revolved Head to Knee Yoga Pose
  1. Begin by sitting upright with your legs outstretched in front of you and spread as wide as is comfortable. Bend your left knee and bring your left foot in towards your torso until the heel is snug against your groin and the sole rests against your right thigh.
  2. Lean your torso to the right until the back of your right shoulder presses against your right knee and your right forearm rests on the floor on the inside of your right leg. Rest your right hand next to your right foot with the palm facing up. Turn your right hand and grasp your foot so that the fingers are on the sole and the thumb on the top.
  3. Inhale and lift your left hand straight up into the air. Sweep it over your head and grasp your right foot. Turn your head so that you are looking up towards the sky.
  4. Hold for about a minute. Switch sides and repeat.
Notes
  • Breathe deeply through each step.
  • Keep your knee straightened and your thigh pressed to the ground throughout.
  • If you have a history of diarrhea problems consult an instructor or doctor before attempting this pose.
Tips
Keep your knee and shoulder in contact the whole time, even if that means you have to bend your knee.
Stretches & Strengthens

All Muscles: Shoulders, lats, hamstrings, spine
Target Muscles: Shoulders, lats, hamstrings

Health Benefits of Revolved Head to Knee Yoga Pose
  • May relieve mild back pain.
  • Can relieve anxiety, fatigue and insomnia.
  • Stimulates internal organs and improves digestion.

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Parivrtta Janu Sirsasana

(par-ee-vrt-tah JAH-new shear-shAHS-anna)

parivrtta: turned around, revolved
janu: knee
sirsa: head, skull, top
asana: posture

History & Mythology

History & Mythology

There’s gotta be some history or mythology on this pose! We’ve looked high and low and have only come up with this message. Perhaps you have some information or resource for us to explore?