Noose Yoga Pose
overview

Noose Yoga Pose is a seated twist pose that targets the shoulders and quads and is ideal for yogis and yoginis at an intermediate to advanced level.

muladhara – the root chakra
manipura – the wisdom chakra
related poses
How To Do Noose Yoga Pose
  1. Begin by entering the Mountain Pose (Tadasana); stand up straight with your feet together and your hands loose at your sides. Shift your stance so your feet are now hip-width apart.
  2. Bend your knees and squat down until your buttocks rests on your heels and your body rest against your thighs.
  3. Shift your knees slightly to the left and begin to twist your torso to the right.
    Reach out with your left arm in such a way that your left elbow presses against the outside your right knee.
  4. Swing your right arm behind your back and try to grasp the fingers or wrist of your left hand with your right hand.
  5. Continue to twist to the right as much as is comfortable. Keep your heels presses into the ground.
  6. Hold for 30 seconds to a minute. Release the twist and repeat on the other side.
Notes
  • Breathe deeply through each step.
  • This pose is advanced so do not attempt it without the guidance of an expert.
  • If you have a history of knee or lower-back injuries you should avoid poses that require squatting.
Tips
If you cannot keep your heels down, support them with a rolled up towel or yoga mat.
If you find it difficult to balance, perform this pose close to a wall and use it to support your back or brace your hands against it.
Stretches & Strengthens

All Muscles: Ankles, quads, groins, chest, shoulders, spine
Target Muscles: Quads, shoulders

Health Benefits of Noose Yoga Pose
  • This pose can help improve posture.
  • Improves digestion and decreases flatulence.
  • Helps with minor neck, shoulder, back and menstrual pain.
  • Helps decrease the severity and frequency of symptoms of asthma.
  • Stimulates inner organs.

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Sanskrit Name & Meaning

Pasasana

(posh-AHs-anna)

pasa: rope, chain, trap, noose
asana: posture

History & Mythology

History & Mythology

There’s gotta be some history or mythology on this pose! We’ve looked high and low and have only come up with this message. Perhaps you have some information or resource for us to explore?